Psychiatrist lists anti-bullying tips [Fremont Tribune, by Tammy Real-McKeighan, 09/10/2017]

Dr. Greg Wigington knows how bullying can affect a child.

But he also knows steps parents can take to help children who become the target of a bully.

Wigington is a psychiatrist at Fremont Health Behavioral Health. He cares for adults, but also specializes in child and adolescent psychiatry.

Continue reading Psychiatrist lists anti-bullying tips [Fremont Tribune, by Tammy Real-McKeighan, 09/10/2017]

Why onlookers hold the key to standing up to bullies [The Guardian, by Tim Lott, 29/09/2017]

Apoll showas that more than half of secondary teacher say bullying is a problem.  This, depressingly, is in line with other data – for instance, from the Rumi Foundation, which holds a yearly survey into bullying  and whose latest figures show a growth in online bullying. Continue reading Why onlookers hold the key to standing up to bullies [The Guardian, by Tim Lott, 29/09/2017]

One in five Irish kids experience cyberbullying, shocking new survey reveals. [Mirror, by Leandro Pondoc, 04/08/2016]

The study also found 1 in 10 adults experience online bullying of their own

One in five Irish kids say that they have been the victim of cyberbullies, a shocking new survey has revealed.
The survey, conducted by ZenithOptimedia, talked to 1,000 adults and 186 kids as part of a study into Internet safety and online bullying in Ireland.
The research found that Irish parents significantly underestimate how common cyberbullying is with children, just 10% of parents confessing they think their children have been victims.
More than a third of kids who admitted to being cyberbullied also said they experienced feelings of depression.

Declan Kelly, Deputy MD at ZenithOptimedia, said: “We carried out this research to look at how Irish people are interacting with the Internet on a daily basis.
“What it [the research] also showed was the inconsistency between parents’ perception of what’s happening with their children online and the reality.”
The study found that more than half of cyberbullying experienced by kids happens on Facebook (51%), compared to other social media services like Instagram (14%).
Meanwhile, when it comes to Snapchat, bullying was found to be higher among girls (29%) than boys (16%).
The research also went into online bullying among adults and found that 1 in 10 adults have admitted to being bullied online.
For adults, the platform for online bullying was disproportionally found to be on Facebook (68%0 compared to other platforms such as Twitter (12%) and Snapchat (7%).
A third of the adults surveyed say that someone has spread lies and rumours about them online, with 18% saying they have had an embarrassing photograph put online and 35% saying they received “threatening texts or emails.”
A worrying 1 in 4 Irish women have said that they are victims of body shaming online in comparison to just 16% with adult men and 9% with children.
When asked about how to counteract online bullying, the most popular course of action, according to both adult and child victims, was ‘unfollowing’ or ‘unfriending’ said bullies.

Young bullies and bullying victims ‘more likely to suffer psychiatric problems and depression as adults’ [Mirror, by Stephen Beech, 09/12/2015]

New research builds on the previous evidence bullying or being bullied may contribute to later mental health problems.

Youngster who are bullied are more likely to suffer psychiatric problems and depression when they grow up, a study shows.

The young bullies themselves are also at greater risk of disorders needing treatment in later life – compared to children who grew up without being exposed the bullying.

New research builds on the previous evidence bullying or being bullied may contribute to later mental health problems.

For the new study, published online by JAMA Psychiatry, researchers looked at associations between bullying behaviour at the age of eight and adult psychiatric problems by the age of 29.

The study used figures from more than 5,000 children in Finland and assessments of bullying and exposure to bullying were based on information from the youngsters, their parents and teachers.

Information on the use of inpatient and outpatient services to treat psychiatric disorders from ages 16 to 29 was obtained from a nationwide hospital register.

Around 90 per cent of the participants did not engage in bullying behaviour and, of those, 11.5 per cent had received a psychiatric diagnosis by follow-up.

 

In comparison, 33 of the 166 participants who engaged in frequent bullying (19.9 per cent), 58 of 251 frequently exposed to bullying (23.1 per cent), and 24 of 77 who both frequently engaged in and were frequently exposed to bullying (31.2 per cent) had psychiatric diagnoses by the age of 29.

The study participants were divided into four groups: those who never or only sometimes bully and are not exposed to bullying; those who frequently bully but are not exposed to bullying; those who were frequently only exposed to bullying; and those who frequently bully and are exposed to bullying.

The treatment of any psychiatric disorder was associated with frequent exposure to bullying, as well as with being a bully and being exposed to bullying.

Exposure to bullying was associated with depression, according to the results.

The findings showed that participants who were bullies and exposed to bullying at age eight had a “high risk” for several psychiatric disorders that required treatment when they were adults.

The researchers said the main limitation of the study was the lack of understanding about how bullying or exposure to bullying may lead to psychiatric disorders.

Corresponding author Doctor Andre Sourander, of the University of Turku in Finland, said: “Future studies containing more nuanced information about the mediating factors that occur between childhood bullying and adulthood disorders will be needed to shed light on this important question.

“Policy makers and health care professionals should be aware of the complex nature between bullying and psychiatric outcomes when they implement prevention and treatment interventions.”

Children as young as twelve found ‘sexting’ [ITV, 09/12/2015]

Children as young as 12 are sending explicit messages of a sexual nature, police in Northamptonshire have said.

Officers are investigating 24 separate cases of ‘sexting’ across the county – the youngest person involved being 12.

They are urging young people to think twice before sending explicit pictures of themselves or posting them on sites such as instagram.

Police are reminding people that one click can have a massive impact 

“It is really important people are aware of the dangers of sharing explicit material online.

“The dissemination of any material depicting nudity or sexual activity involving young people could constitute a criminal offence.

“It may seem like harmless fun at the time but it can have huge emotional consequences for those involved, leaving them vulnerable to blackmail, bullying and harm.

“It’s really important to remember that once an image is online all control of where it ends up is lost.

– Detective Inspector Richard Tompkins.